How to be a Merry Widow: Life after death for the older lady

Merry Widow
“I make no apologies for admitting that being a widow has been a very cheerful experience and, with the help and support of other female friends in my position, we’ve all found an extremely happy new rhythm to life,”

The title of Mary Essinger’s new book might be considered unconventional by some, but ‘How to be a Merry Widow’ lives up to its name with gusto.

Essinger believes widowhood presents any woman with a unique opportunity to renew life on their own terms, and in this remarkable book, with energy and frankness, Mary gives extensive, friendly, practical and personal advice to the reader.

A unique opportunity to renew life on their own terms

 

The guide is entirely unique, reaching out to women blighted by loss to remind them that a deceased spouse can forever be memorialized with the continuation of a vibrant, rich and content new life.

How to be a Merry Widow

Synopsis:

This wise, humorous and highly entertaining book brings compassion, pithiness and excellent practical suggestions to the vital task of advising widows how to make themselves merry despite having lost the love of their life. After all, as Mary Essinger points out here in ‘How to be a Merry Widow’…

‘Look on the positive side, no shirts to iron for a start. Rejoice in your independence. You can do exactly as you like; paint the house pink, invite your chain-smoking brother to stay or relocate to anywhere on the planet. Consider the good things about being alone. For the first time in your life you are free. Spoil yourself; spend his money on chocolate and taxis. You’re worth it.

Plan at least one social event every day

Remove yourself from the place of loneliness, your home. Plan at least one social event every day and plan outings to look forward to.

Unless you are dying, staying in all day is a bad idea and will make you morose. You may have demanding things to do in the home but go out at least for some part of the day. Too cold? Wear three coats but go out. Raining? Big umbrella but go out. Not feeling too good? Try fresh air and a walk. Fight any temptation to hide away feeling sorry for yourself.’

Ultimately, Mary urges widows to follow her advice because their dear departed one would want them to be happy.

“I make no apologies for admitting that being a widow has been a very cheerful experience and, with the help and support of other female friends in my position, we’ve all found an extremely happy new rhythm to life,” explains the author. “Widowhood is full of positives and, in this book, I share them in all of their glory!”

Continuing,

“It’s not about forgetting your spouse or “moving on” – but remembering them by honouring their spirit through the continuation of a life that’s rich with growth, indulgence and new experiences. The book is very short and written to help any woman align her new life quickly. It could be exactly what you’re looking for.”

 

About the Author – Mary Essinger

Mary Essinger was born in 1932. She attended Coalville’s King Edward V11 Grammar School and after leaving school in 1946 went to work in factories before becoming a dress designer. Mary taught Spoken English for twenty-five years. In 2003 she published her first novel, Wounded Bird of Paradise. Her book Mary, Quite Contrary, a memoir of her life in a Leicestershire village before the Second World War and also her life afterwards, was published by The Conrad Press in 2016.

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